28 Species Of Warblers in Vermont (ID, Song, Season Guide)

Discover the ultimate guide that will assist you in recognizing all the various warbler species that frequently inhabit Vermont. Equipped with detailed photo identification and descriptions, as well as captivating audio recordings of their melodic songs, fascinating facts, and much more.

Warblers, those charming migratory songbirds, embark on arduous journeys spanning great distances, from the depths of South America to the vast breeding grounds of Canada. These active and vibrant creatures dart across the landscape in a brilliant display of yellow and green hues, serenading us with an extraordinary medley of melodies.

Renowned as wood-warblers in North America, these avian wonders predominantly inhabit wooded areas and forests. Beware, for you may fall victim to the dreaded “warbler neck,” a condition causing discomfort and tingling in your neck, resulting from gazing skyward through binoculars in search of these elusive beauties perched high in the treetops.

While warblers primarily sustain themselves on insects, they occasionally grace backyard feeders with their presence, enticed by seeds and delectable mealworms. Delve deeper into the avian world and discover other bird species that frequently visit the charming landscapes of Vermont, all while gaining access to a complimentary identification chart.

This comprehensive guide serves as your invaluable tool for identifying the warblers found in Vermont, encompassing those species classified as regular inhabitants according to reliable sources such as Avibase. The information provided is derived from meticulous data collected by devoted bird enthusiasts using the remarkable platform known as eBird, ensuring its authenticity and accuracy.

Within this guide, you will not only hear the enchanting songs of these warblers but also gain access to a comprehensive catalog detailing the diverse song types they employ. To further aid in your identification endeavors, we invite you to explore an additional guide featuring 13 unmistakable warbler songs.

Prepare yourself for a captivating journey through the warbler species residing in Vermont, organized meticulously in a table of contents, which serves as your compass throughout this extraordinary expedition.

Warblers in Vermont by Season:

Summer Warblers in Vermont:
Common Yellowthroat, Ovenbird, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Chestnut-sided Warbler, American Redstart, Black-throated Green Warbler, Black-and-white Warbler, Black-throated Blue Warbler, Blackburnian Warbler, Pine Warbler, Magnolia Warbler, Northern Parula, Nashville Warbler, Northern Waterthrush, Palm Warbler, Blackpoll Warbler, Canada Warbler, Louisiana Waterthrush, Mourning Warbler, Blue-winged Warbler, Golden-winged Warbler, Cerulean Warbler.

Warblers in Vermont during Migration:
Tennessee Warbler, Bay-breasted Warbler, Wilson’s Warbler, Orange-crowned Warbler, Connecticut Warbler.

Vermont is home to a remarkable array of 28 warbler species, each with its distinct characteristics and allure.

1. Common Yellowthroat

Venture into the world of the Common Yellowthroat, an avian resident of Vermont from April to October, with a few lingering individuals braving the cold until January. This delightful species graces 37% of summer checklists submitted by keen birdwatchers across the state.

The Common Yellowthroat, with its brownish back and vibrant yellow underbelly, accompanied by a graceful long tail, captivates its audience. Males boast a distinguishing black mask adorning their faces, while the intensity of their yellow plumage may vary depending on the geographical location, occasionally showcasing an olive tinge underneath.

Scientific Name: Geothlypis trichas
Length: 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm)
Weight: 0.3-0.3 ounces (9-10 g)
Wingspan: 5.9-7.5 inches (15-19 cm)

During summer, the Common Yellowthroat breeds across most of North America, excluding Alaska and northern Canada. While some individuals remain year-round along the Gulf Coast and Pacific Southwest, others embark on a southerly migration for the winter months.

These charming creatures inhabit marshy areas, wetlands, and brushy fields, thriving amidst dense, tangled vegetation.

Listen to the captivating song of the Common Yellowthroat, courtesy of Paul Marvin (XC629250), available at www.xeno-canto.org/629250.

Female Common Yellowthroats construct their nests near the ground in marshy regions, utilizing reeds for support. Crafted from grass and sedges, the nest rests upon a leaf and grass platform. The female lays up to six eggs, which incubate for approximately twelve days before the young take flight from the nest, following the same timeline.

To entice Common Yellowthroats to your vast backyard, ensure its lush vegetation and native plants teem with insects, creating an irresistible haven for these captivating songbirds.

Fun Fact: The black mask adorning the face of the male Common Yellowthroat serves as a visual cue to courting males, instigating aggressive behavior towards fake birds. However, intriguingly, when the bird lacks this distinctive feature, aggression ceases.

2. Ovenbird

Join the realm of the Ovenbird, a summer resident of Vermont observed in 30% of checklists during this period. These enchanting creatures grace the state from mid-April until September, with a few lingering individuals persisting until November.

Ovenbirds possess a more subdued appearance compared to their warbler counterparts, sporting olive-green backs and black-and-white-spotted undersides.

  • Scientific Name: Seiurus aurocapilla
  • Length: 4.3-5.5 inches (11-14 cm)
  • Weight: 0.6-1.0 ounces (16-28 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-10.2 inches (19-26 cm)

Within the northeastern United States, Canada, the Midwest, and even as far as northwest Canada, Ovenbirds establish their breeding grounds. During migration, they traverse eastern states in search of suitable habitats. Winter beckons them to Florida, Mexico, Central America, northern South America, and the Caribbean.

These industrious birds scour leaf litter on the forest floor, meticulously rummaging for insects, their primary sustenance.

Immerse yourself in the melodious song of the Ovenbird, courtesy of Christopher McPherson (XC602036), accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/602036.

Ovenbird nests are typically situated on the ground, meticulously crafted by females using leaves, grass, bark, and other plant materials. Adorned with a side entrance, the nest receives additional support from animal hair. Within this cozy abode, up to five eggs incubate for two weeks, with the young emerging within ten days.

Amidst your backyard haven, entice Ovenbirds by embracing the serenity of dense vegetation and native plants. This abundant oasis brimming with insects will surely captivate their attention.

Fun Fact: The Ovenbird derives its name from the distinctively shaped nest it constructs, resembling a traditional Dutch oven.

3. Yellow-rumped Warbler

Prepare to encounter the Yellow-rumped Warbler, a Vermont summer resident whose population swells during migratory periods in May and October. This captivating species adorns 17% of summer checklists and impressively manifests in up to 39% of checklists throughout migration.

Yellow-rumped Warblers exhibit gray plumage, accentuated by vivid yellow flashes on their face, sides, and rump, while their wings boast a pristine white. Female

individuals may sport a tinge of brown, and winter attire showcases a paler brown hue, with their rumps and sides radiantly transforming into bright yellow and gray come spring.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga coronata
  • Length: 4.7-5.5 inches (12-14 cm)
  • Weight: 0.4-0.5 ounces (12-13 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-9.1 inches (19-23 cm)

Yellow-rumped Warblers predominantly breed in Canada, the Rocky Mountains, and the Appalachian Mountains. During migration, they grace the Midwest with their presence before embarking on an extraordinary winter journey to southern and southwestern United States, the Pacific Coast, Mexico, Central America, and beyond.

These delightful birds often dwell within coniferous forests, particularly during the breeding season. As winter approaches, they venture into open areas adorned with fruit-bearing shrubs. Throughout summer, their diet mainly consists of insects, while migration and winter prompt a shift toward a fruit-based fare, including bayberry and wax myrtle.

Unveil the enchanting melody of the Yellow-rumped Warbler through the auditory gift presented by Christopher McPherson (XC602699), accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/602699.

Yellow-rumped Warbler nests, delicately woven by females, grace the lofty branches of conifer trees. Composed of twigs, pine needles, and grass, these nests are meticulously secured using spider silk. Animal hair, moss, and feathers furnish the cozy interior. The female lays up to six eggs, which incubate for two weeks before the young venture forth after an additional two weeks.

To beckon Yellow-rumped Warblers to your backyard sanctuary, generously provide sunflower seeds, suet, raisins, and peanut butter.

Fun Fact: During winter, Yellow-rumped Warblers congregate in flocks, often numbering in the thousands. Their assertiveness towards any intruding species is a testament to their unwavering devotion to safeguarding their territory.

4. Yellow Warbler

Embark on a journey through the vibrant world of the Yellow Warbler, a summer visitor in Vermont that graces 24% of summer checklists. These captivating creatures arrive in April, and their migratory instincts lead them southward once again come October.

Yellow Warblers are petite birds adorned in brilliant shades of yellow, with a touch of green on their backs. The males, distinguished by chestnut streaks on their breasts, exhibit a stunning display of color. In contrast, females and juveniles possess a more subdued appearance, lacking the distinctive streaks.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga petechia
  • Length: 4.7-5.1 inches (12-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (9-11 g)
  • Wingspan: 6.3-7.9 inches (16-20 cm)

These remarkable songbirds embark on a remarkable journey, migrating extensive distances to breed in Canada and the United States (excluding southeastern states) before venturing back to Central and South America for the winter. However, during migration, they can be spotted in southeastern US states.

Yellow Warblers thrive along streams, wetlands, and the edges of fields, where they skillfully forage for a variety of insects, including caterpillars, midges, beetles, bugs, and wasps.

Immerse yourself in the melodious song of the Yellow Warbler, courtesy of Richard E. Webster (XC662546), accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/662546.

Nests of the Yellow Warbler are nestled within small trees or shrubs, expertly woven from bark, grass, and plant materials, and carefully secured with spider webs. The interior is lined with softer materials like hair, feathers, and plant down. Within these cozy abodes, up to seven eggs incubate for around twelve days, with an additional ten days for the young to fledge the nest.

To entice Yellow Warblers to your backyard haven, provide suet, oranges, peanut butter, and plants that bear berries. Embrace the beauty of native plants that attract insects without the use of harmful pesticides, and consider incorporating birdbaths with fountains amidst secluded plantings to offer protection and serenity.

Fun Fact: Yellow Warblers face a curious challenge as Cowbirds often deposit their eggs within the nests of these warblers. In response, the Yellow Warblers construct a new nest atop the old one, repeating this process up to six times to ensure the survival of their own offspring.

5. Chestnut-sided Warbler

Prepare to immerse yourself in the captivating presence of the Chestnut-sided Warbler, a Vermont summer resident observed in 22% of checklists during this season. These delightful creatures grace the state from mid-April to October, leaving behind a trail of awe and wonder.

Male Chestnut-sided Warblers feature bright yellow crowns and striking black masks, while their underbellies showcase a charming gray hue, accompanied by chestnut accents along the sides. As winter approaches, males molt into a green and white color palette, resembling the breeding females.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga pensylvanica
  • Length: 4.7-5.5 inches (12-14 cm)
  • Weight: 0.4-0.5 ounces (10.7-14.3 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.3 inches (19-21 cm)

These splendid warblers establish their breeding grounds in the northeastern United States and southeastern Canada. They also make appearances during migration across eastern US states.

Chestnut-sided Warblers exhibit a preference for forest edges and thickets, where they diligently search for insects. They are particularly drawn to forests undergoing regeneration after fires, logging activities, or floods.

Experience the delightful song of the Chestnut-sided Warbler, courtesy of Christopher McPherson (XC600739), accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/600739.

Nests of the Chestnut-sided Warbler are nestled low in trees and shrubs, carefully constructed using grass, weeds, and bark intricately woven into a cup shape. The nest is lined with softer materials to provide comfort for the eggs. These warblers lay up to five eggs, which incubate for twelve days before the young take their first flights after approximately eleven days.

Fun Fact: The Chestnut-sided Warbler displays a unique preference for regenerating forests. Once the forests reach a mature state, approximately ten years later, they seek out alternative breeding grounds.

6. American Redstart

Indulge in the enchanting presence of the American Redstart, a Vermont summer resident that graces the state from April to October. Recorded in 19% of summer checklists, these captivating creatures are sure to leave a lasting impression.

American Redstarts flaunt predominantly black plumage adorned with vibrant orange patches and a contrasting white belly. While males sport this striking coloration, females exude an olive-gray hue, accompanied by touches of yellow.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga ruticilla
  • Length: 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.2-0.3 ounces (6-9 g)
  • Wingspan: 6.3-7.5 inches (16-19 cm)

Breeding in eastern US states, Canada, and northwestern US states, the American Redstart also makes appearances during migration across central and western US states.

Delight in the presence of American Redstarts in deciduous woodlands, where they actively hunt insects. You may even spot them in backyards and thickets, indulging in delectable berries like serviceberry and magnolia.

Immerse yourself in the captivating song of the American Redstart, their melodic tune characterized by a drop in pitch at the end. Listen to their enchanting song brought to you by Nick Kiehl (XC522368) at www.xeno-canto.org/522368.

Nests of the American Redstart find their home close to the trunk of trees or large shrubs, meticulously constructed using bark, grass, and other plant materials. The nests are adorned with animal hair, providing additional comfort. Within these nests, up to five eggs incubate for just under two weeks, followed by a week or two for the young to leave their cozy abode.

To allure American Redstarts to your backyard oasis, offer an enticing spread of berry plants such as magnolia and serviceberry.

Fun Fact: American Redstart parents exhibit selective feeding behavior, tending to certain chicks rather than uniformly providing sustenance to all.

7. Black-throated Green Warbler

Prepare to be captivated by the elegant beauty of the Black-throated Green Warbler, a Vermont summer resident observed in 14% of checklists. This striking species can be found in the state from April to mid-November.

Black-throated Green Warblers are petite songbirds adorned in a radiant yellow hue, particularly on their face and head, accompanied by an olive-yellow back. Their black streaking on the sides and wings provides a distinguishing feature, while their underbelly displays a whitish tone. Males boast large black patches on their throats, a characteristic that distinguishes them from other small yellow birds. In contrast, females and juveniles exhibit smaller throat patches.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga virens
  • Length: 4.3-4.7 inches (11-12 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (7-11 g)
  • Wingspan: 6.7-7.9 inches (17-20 cm)

Black-throated Green Warblers embark on a remarkable migration journey across the eastern United States, reaching their breeding grounds in northeastern US states and Canada. Their winter sojourn leads them to Mexico, northern South America, and the Caribbean.

Delight in the presence of Black-throated Green Warblers high up in forests, where they actively forage for insects. Their black throat serves as a helpful distinguishing feature amidst the vibrant foliage.

Immerse yourself in the melodious song of the Black-throated Green Warbler, courtesy of Paul Driver (XC187636), accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/187636.

Nests of the Black-throated Green Warbler find their home in small trees, nestled close to the trunk. These intricately woven nests incorporate twigs, bark, and plant materials, secured with spiders’ webs. The interior is lined with softer materials like moss, grass, animal hair, and feathers. Within these nests, around four eggs are laid, incubating for twelve days before the young emerge, ready to explore the world.

To create a welcoming haven for Black-throated Green Warblers in your backyard, embrace the presence of mature trees.

Fun Fact: Male Black-throated Green Warblers are renowned for their melodious serenades, capable of singing over 400 times in an hour. When they successfully chase off rivals, they engage in a unique “gloating” flight, characterized by descending at great speed in a whirling motion while raising and spreading their tails.

8. Black-and-white Warbler

Step into the monochrome realm of the Black-and-white Warbler, a Vermont summer resident appearing in 14% of checklists. These distinctive warblers grace the state from April to October.

Black-and-white Warblers possess a striking striped appearance, making them easily identifiable. Males showcase a prominent black patch across their eye and cheek, with their overall black coloration darker than that of females.

  • Scientific Name: Mniotilta varia
  • Length: 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.5 ounces (8-15 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.1-8.7 inches (18-22 cm)

Within the eastern United States and Canada, Black-and-white Warblers establish their breeding grounds. For winter, they migrate to Florida, along the Gulf Coast, Mexico, Baja California, the Caribbean, and northern South America. During migration, they can be spotted in central US states.

Spot Black-and-white Warblers as they skillfully hop up and down tree trunks and branches within forests, diligently searching for insects.

Immerse yourself in the delightful song of the Black-and-white Warbler, brought to you by Christopher McPherson (XC600300), accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/600300.

Nests of the Black-and-white Warbler are skillfully hidden close to or on the ground, often tucked under logs or shrubs. These nests are constructed using bark, grass, and pine needles intricately woven into a cup shape. Up to five eggs are laid within the nest, incubating for approximately eleven days before the young depart after a further ten days.

9. Black-throated Blue Warbler

Prepare to be enchanted by the allure of the Black-throated Blue Warbler, a Vermont summer resident appearing in 11% of checklists. These captivating birds arrive in April and embark on their migratory journey come October.

Male Black-throated Blue Warblers exhibit a breathtaking rich blue hue on their backs, complemented by a white underbelly. Their unique coloration sets them apart from the predominantly yellow warbler species. In contrast, females possess a more subtle grayish-olive appearance.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga caerulescens
  • Length: 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (8-12 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-7.9 inches (19-20 cm)

Black-throated Blue Warblers establish their breeding grounds in northeastern US states and Canada. During migration, they traverse eastern US states, and for the winter months, they seek refuge in Central America, the Caribbean, and northern South America.

Discover Black-throated Blue Warblers in lower areas of deciduous forests, shrubby regions, and occasionally even in backyards, where they diligently search for spiders, flies, and caterpillars.

Immerse yourself in the captivating song of the Black-throated Blue Warbler, accompanied by √Čtienne Leroy (XC415422), accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/415422.

Nests of the Black-throated Blue Warbler are concealed within dense shrubs, meticulously crafted using twigs, bark, and held together with spiders’ webs and saliva. The interior is lined with animal hair, moss, and needles. Within these nests, approximately four eggs are laid, incubating for around two weeks.

Fun Fact: After the breeding season, male Black-throated Blue Warblers actively listen for the songs of other males. Successful singers indicate areas where they have established their territories, while unsuccessful males refrain from singing altogether.

10. Blackburnian Warbler

Embark on a journey into the vivid world of the Blackburnian Warbler, a summer visitor to Vermont recorded in 9% of checklists. These resplendent birds grace the state from May to September, with a few individuals lingering until October.

Blackburnian Warbler males captivate with their breathtaking black and orange plumage, adorned with an orange throat and facial markings. Their black backs and wings provide a striking contrast, while their underbellies feature white with black streaks. In contrast, females exhibit a yellower coloration. Notably, each side of their face, near the eyes, showcases distinctive dark triangles.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga fusca
  • Length: 4.3-4.7 inches (11-12 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (8.9-12.6 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.9-9.1 inches (20-23 cm)

Blackburnian Warblers undertake a remarkable migratory journey, gracing the eastern United States during migration. They establish their breeding grounds in Canada and northeastern US states, with some individuals breeding as far south as Virginia or North Carolina. For winter, they find solace in the enchanting realms of South America.

Discover Blackburnian Warblers within wooded areas and forests, where they diligently hunt for caterpillars. Their black throat serves as a distinctive feature that sets them apart from other small yellow birds.

Immerse yourself in the captivating song of the Blackburnian Warbler, serenaded by Hal Mitchell (XC317904), accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/317904.

11. Pine Warbler

Enter the realm of the Pine Warbler, a Vermont summer resident that graces the state from April to October. This delightful species can be spotted in 7% of summer checklists, adding a touch of charm to the natural surroundings.

Pine Warblers exhibit a predominantly olive-green plumage, with subtle streaking on their back. Their underparts are pale yellow, and they possess a distinct white eye-ring. These warblers are well adapted to their preferred habitat in pine forests.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga pinus
  • Length: 4.7-5.9 inches (12-15 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (9-11 g)
  • Wingspan: 8.3-9.8 inches (21-25 cm)

Breeding in the northeastern United States and Canada, the Pine Warbler embarks on an extensive migration journey, gracing Vermont during the summer months. During winter, they seek refuge in the southeastern United States and parts of Mexico.

Discover the Pine Warbler’s melodious song, a cheerful tune that echoes through the trees. Immerse yourself in their vibrant melodies, reminiscent of peaceful woodland serenades.

Nests of the Pine Warbler are typically constructed in pine trees, situated at varying heights above the ground. These nests are carefully crafted using twigs, grass, and pine needles, providing a cozy haven for their eggs. Pine Warblers lay an average of 3-5 eggs, with an incubation period of approximately 10-14 days.

Fun Fact: The Pine Warbler’s unique diet includes a preference for pine seeds, making them one of the few warbler species that regularly consumes seeds as a significant part of their diet.

12. Magnolia Warbler

Prepare to be enchanted by the elegance of the Magnolia Warbler, a migrant species that passes through Vermont during spring and fall. This stunning warbler can be observed in 6% of checklists during migration periods.

Magnolia Warblers showcase a striking appearance, characterized by a black mask across their eyes and a bright yellow throat and underparts. Their wings and back exhibit a combination of black and white, resembling a refined monochromatic pattern.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga magnolia
  • Length: 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (9-11 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.3 inches (19-21 cm)

During migration, Magnolia Warblers undertake a remarkable journey, breeding in the boreal forests of Canada and parts of the northeastern United States. Their winter grounds stretch from Mexico and Central America to northern South America.

Spot these enchanting birds in a variety of habitats, including mixed forests, woodland edges, and even parks and gardens. They are known for their active foraging behavior as they search for insects amidst the foliage.

Immerse yourself in the sweet melodies of the Magnolia Warbler’s song, a delightful chorus that adds a touch of magic to the surrounding atmosphere.

Although Magnolia Warblers do not breed in Vermont, their transient presence during migration provides a remarkable opportunity to admire their unique beauty.

Fun Fact: Despite their name, Magnolia Warblers do not have a strong association with magnolia trees. The name was derived from the fact that the first specimen was collected near a magnolia tree during migration.

13. Northern Parula

Marvel at the petite and colorful Northern Parula, a migratory warbler species that graces Vermont during the breeding season. Catch a glimpse of these enchanting birds from May to September, as they add a touch of vibrancy to the natural surroundings.

Northern Parulas exhibit a striking combination of blue, gray, and yellow plumage. Males boast a bluish-gray back, a yellow throat and breast, and prominent chestnut-colored bands across their back. Females display similar features but with slightly duller colors.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga americana
  • Length: 4.3-4.7 inches (11-12 cm)
  • Weight: 0.2-0.3 ounces (6-9 g)
  • Wingspan: 6.7-7.5 inches (17-19 cm)

During the breeding season, Northern Parulas establish their nesting grounds in the northeastern United States and parts of Canada. As migratory birds, they spend their winters in Mexico, Central America, and the Caribbean.

These lively warblers can be found in a variety of habitats, including mixed forests, deciduous woodlands, and swampy areas. They have a particular affinity for areas with dense vegetation and water sources.

Immerse yourself in the delightful song of the Northern Parula, a melodious trill that resonates through the trees. Listen to their cheerful serenade and let their captivating tunes lift your spirits.

Nests of the Northern Parula are skillfully constructed in a variety of locations, including tree cavities, hanging moss, and even in the tangled foliage of epiphytic plants. These nests are typically lined with feathers, plant fibers, and moss. The female Northern Parula lays a clutch of 3-5 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-14 days.

Fun Fact: Northern Parulas are known for their unique foraging behavior known as “hover-gleaning.” They hover in mid-air to pluck insects from leaves and branches, showcasing their agility and adaptability in search of food.

14. Nashville Warbler

Delight in the presence of the Nashville Warbler, a migratory songbird that passes through Vermont during spring and fall. Spot these charming warblers as they grace the state with their vibrant presence during their journey.

Nashville Warblers exhibit a striking combination of bright yellow underparts and olive-green upperparts. They possess a distinct gray head with a white eyering, which adds a touch of elegance to their appearance.

  • Scientific Name: Leiothlypis ruficapilla
  • Length: 4.3-4.7 inches (11-12 cm)
  • Weight: 0.2-0.3 ounces (6-8 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.1-7.9 inches (18-20 cm)

During migration, Nashville Warblers traverse vast distances, breeding in the boreal forests of Canada and parts of the northeastern United States. They spend their winters in Mexico, Central America, and northern South America.

Discover these delightful birds in a variety of habitats, including deciduous forests, mixed woodlands, and shrubby areas. They are known for their active and agile foraging behavior as they search for insects and small arthropods.

Immerse yourself in the sweet, high-pitched song of the Nashville Warbler, a cheerful melody that echoes through the trees. Allow their melodious tunes to transport you to the heart of nature.

Although Nashville Warblers do not breed in Vermont, their transient presence during migration offers a special opportunity to admire their unique beauty.

Fun Fact: The Nashville Warbler was named after Nashville, Tennessee, where the first specimen was discovered. However, it is not commonly found in that particular region, showcasing the diversity and unpredictability of migratory patterns.

15. Northern Waterthrush

Indulge in the presence of the Northern Waterthrush, a charming warbler species that graces Vermont during the breeding season. Catch a glimpse of these delightful birds from May to September as they add their melodic presence to the wetland habitats.

The Northern Waterthrush possesses a distinct appearance with streaked brown upperparts and a buff-colored breast. They have a prominent white eyestripe and a slightly curved bill that aids in their foraging behavior.

  • Scientific Name: Parkesia noveboracensis
  • Length: 5.1-5.9 inches (13-15 cm)
  • Weight: 0.4-0.6 ounces (11-17 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.9-8.7 inches (20-22 cm)

During the breeding season, Northern Waterthrushes establish their territories in the northeastern United States and parts of Canada. As their name suggests, they are often found near freshwater sources such as marshes, bogs, and streams.

Immerse yourself in the enchanting song of the Northern Waterthrush, a melodic and flute-like series of notes that resonates through the wetland habitats. Their song adds a touch of serenity to the surroundings.

Nests of the Northern Waterthrush are skillfully constructed on the ground, often hidden in vegetation near water sources. These nests are typically cup-shaped and made of leaves, grass, and moss. The female Northern Waterthrush lays a clutch of 4-6 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-14 days.

Fun Fact: Northern Waterthrushes have a unique feeding behavior known as “tail-wagging,” where they flick their tail up and down rapidly as they walk along the water’s edge or through wetlands. This behavior helps them disturb and capture small insects and aquatic invertebrates.

16. Palm Warbler

Embrace the vibrant presence of the Palm Warbler, a migratory songbird that passes through Vermont during spring and fall. Marvel at their captivating appearance and cheerful demeanor as they grace the state with their lively presence.

Palm Warblers showcase a distinctive plumage, with a brown back and yellow underparts. They possess a rusty-colored cap on their head, adding a touch of warmth to their overall appearance. Their tail often exhibits constant wagging, adding an element of liveliness to their behavior.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga palmarum
  • Length: 4.7-5.5 inches (12-14 cm)
  • Weight: 0.4-0.5 ounces (11-14 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.9-9.1 inches (20-23 cm)

During migration, Palm Warblers embark on a remarkable journey, breeding in the boreal forests of Canada and the northeastern United States. They spend their winters in the southern United States, the Caribbean, and Central America.

Discover these delightful warblers in a variety of habitats, including open woodlands, shrubby areas, and even fields and parks. They are often found on the ground, actively foraging for insects amidst leaf litter and vegetation.

Immerse yourself in the sweet and melodic song of the Palm Warbler, a cheerful tune that resonates through the air. Their song adds a touch of joy to the surroundings, welcoming the arrival of spring or bidding farewell to the season.

While Palm Warblers do not breed in Vermont, their transient presence during migration offers a special opportunity to witness their vibrant colors and charming behavior.

Fun Fact: Palm Warblers have an interesting feeding behavior known as “tail-pumping.” They repeatedly raise and lower their tail while foraging, which is believed to help flush out insects from the vegetation and aid in their capture.

17. Blackpoll Warbler

Admire the resilience and remarkable journey of the Blackpoll Warbler, a migratory songbird that passes through Vermont during spring and fall. Witness their awe-inspiring migration and appreciate their unique beauty as they briefly grace the state.

Blackpoll Warblers exhibit a striking appearance, with a black cap and white cheeks that contrast with their yellow underparts. Their back and wings display a mixture of black and white feathers, adding to their distinctive allure.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga striata
  • Length: 4.7-5.5 inches (12-14 cm)
  • Weight: 0.4-0.5 ounces (11-14 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.7 inches (19-22 cm)

During migration, Blackpoll Warblers embark on an incredible journey that takes them from their breeding grounds in the boreal forests of Canada and Alaska all the way to their wintering grounds in northern South America. This migration route is one of the longest and most impressive among all songbirds.

Spot these resilient birds in a variety of habitats, including forests, woodlands, and even coastal areas. They are known for their strong and efficient flight, which helps them cover vast distances during their migration.

Immerse yourself in the soft and high-pitched song of the Blackpoll Warbler, a delightful melody that echoes through the trees. Their song accompanies them on their arduous journey, providing a sense of companionship.

While Blackpoll Warblers do not breed in Vermont, their transient presence during migration offers a special opportunity to witness their incredible journey and appreciate their unique adaptations.

Fun Fact: The Blackpoll Warbler holds the impressive record for the longest overwater migration of any species of songbird. They undertake a non-stop flight of over 1,800 miles (2,900 km) across the Atlantic Ocean during their fall migration, from northeastern North America to South America.

18. Canada Warbler

Bask in the beauty of the Canada Warbler, a migratory songbird that graces Vermont during the breeding season. Marvel at their elegant appearance and melodious songs as they add their enchanting presence to the state’s woodlands.

Canada Warblers exhibit a striking combination of grayish-blue upperparts and bright yellow underparts. They possess a bold necklace of black streaks on their breast, which distinguishes them from other warbler species.

  • Scientific Name: Cardellina canadensis
  • Length: 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (9-11 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.7 inches (19-22 cm)

During the breeding season, Canada Warblers establish their nesting grounds in the boreal forests of Canada and the northeastern United States. Their preferred habitat includes moist, dense woodlands near streams and wet areas.

Immerse yourself in the sweet and melodious song of the Canada Warbler, a series of rich and warbling notes that resonate through the trees. Their song carries a sense of tranquility and echoes the peacefulness of their woodland homes.

Nests of the Canada Warbler are skillfully crafted in dense shrubs or low tree branches. They are made from grass, bark, moss, and other plant materials, forming a neat cup-shaped structure. The female Canada Warbler lays a clutch of 4-5 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-14 days.

Fun Fact: Canada Warblers have a unique feeding behavior known as “hover-gleaning.” They hover in mid-air to pluck insects from leaves and branches, showcasing their agility and precise foraging techniques.

19. Louisiana Waterthrush

Embrace the captivating presence of the Louisiana Waterthrush, a migratory warbler species that graces Vermont during the breeding season. Witness their energetic behavior and enjoy their delightful songs as they add a touch of liveliness to the state’s waterways.

Louisiana Waterthrushes possess a striking appearance, with warm brown upperparts and a white belly. They have distinct white eyestripes and a long bill that aids in their foraging activities along the water’s edge.

  • Scientific Name: Parkesia motacilla
  • Length: 5.5-6.3 inches (14-16 cm)
  • Weight: 0.6-0.7 ounces (17-20 g)
  • Wingspan: 8.7-9.8 inches (22-25 cm)

During the breeding season, Louisiana Waterthrushes establish their territories in the eastern United States and parts of Canada. They are often found near streams, rivers, and wetland habitats, where they forage for small aquatic invertebrates.

Immerse yourself in the melodious song of the Louisiana Waterthrush, a series of rich and bubbling notes that echo through the riparian habitats. Their songs are a true delight to the ears and evoke a sense of the flowing water they call home.

Nests of the Louisiana Waterthrush are skillfully constructed along stream banks or near water sources. They are often hidden in the crevices of rocks or under tree roots, providing a secure and well-concealed spot for their eggs. The female Louisiana Waterthrush lays a clutch of 4-6 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-14 days.

Fun Fact: Louisiana Waterthrushes are known for their unique feeding behavior called “foot-probing.” They use their feet to stir up and disturb the substrate in streambeds, allowing them to flush out small invertebrates and capture them with their bill.

20. Mourning Warbler

Discover the beauty of the Mourning Warbler, a migratory songbird that graces Vermont during the breeding season. Admire their subtle yet captivating appearance and enjoy the privilege of witnessing their presence during their short stay.

Mourning Warblers exhibit a unique and understated beauty, with olive-green upperparts and a bright yellow belly. They possess a gray hood and distinct black streaks on their breast, creating a striking contrast with their overall plumage.

  • Scientific Name: Geothlypis philadelphia
  • Length: 4.7-5.1 inches (12-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (8-12 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.3 inches (19-21 cm)

During the breeding season, Mourning Warblers establish their nesting grounds in the northeastern United States and parts of Canada. They favor dense understory habitats in forests, particularly those near wet areas and thick vegetation.

Immerse yourself in the gentle and melodious song of the Mourning Warbler, a series of rich and flutelike notes that carry through the woods. Their song reflects their secretive nature and adds an element of tranquility to their woodland homes.

Nests of the Mourning Warbler are carefully constructed in low shrubs or on the ground, often hidden amidst dense vegetation. They are made from leaves, bark, and plant fibers, forming a cup-shaped structure that provides a safe haven for their eggs. The female Mourning Warbler lays a clutch of 4-5 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-14 days.

Fun Fact: The Mourning Warbler’s scientific name, Geothlypis philadelphia, was given in honor of Philip Syng Physick, a prominent 19th-century American physician and surgeon who made significant contributions to the field of medicine.

21. Blue-winged Warbler

Celebrate the presence of the Blue-winged Warbler, a migratory songbird that graces Vermont during the breeding season. Witness their vibrant colors and enjoy their distinctive songs as they bring a touch of cheer to the state’s woodlands.

Blue-winged Warblers exhibit a striking combination of bright yellow underparts and bluish-gray wings. Males possess a bold black eye mask and a small patch of blue on their wings, which gives them their unique name. Females are slightly duller in color but still showcase the characteristic yellow plumage.

  • Scientific Name: Vermivora cyanoptera
  • Length: 4.7-5.1 inches (12-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (8-12 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.3 inches (19-21 cm)

During the breeding season, Blue-winged Warblers establish their nesting grounds in the eastern United States and parts of Canada. They prefer open habitats with shrubby vegetation, such as young forests, abandoned fields, and grassy areas.

Immerse yourself in the sweet and buzzy song of the Blue-winged Warbler, a delightful melody that fills the air with energy and enthusiasm. Their songs are a true reflection of their lively nature and evoke a sense of joy in the surrounding woodlands.

Nests of the Blue-winged Warbler are skillfully constructed in low shrubs or small trees. They are made from grass, plant fibers, and bark, forming a neat and compact cup-shaped structure. The female Blue-winged Warbler lays a clutch of 4-5 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-14 days.

Fun Fact: Blue-winged Warblers are known to hybridize with Golden-winged Warblers, resulting in a unique hybrid species known as Brewster’s Warbler. This hybridization process and the resulting hybrids have been subjects of interest for researchers studying avian speciation and hybridization.

22. Golden-winged Warbler

Celebrate the presence of the Golden-winged Warbler, a migratory songbird that graces Vermont during the breeding season. Witness their exquisite beauty and enjoy their melodious songs as they add a touch of elegance to the state’s woodlands.

Golden-winged Warblers showcase a captivating appearance, with gray upperparts and vibrant yellow underparts. Males possess striking golden-yellow patches on their wings, which stand out prominently against their overall plumage. Females are slightly duller in color but still exhibit the characteristic yellow tones.

  • Scientific Name: Vermivora chrysoptera
  • Length: 4.7-5.1 inches (12-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (8-12 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.3 inches (19-21 cm)

During the breeding season, Golden-winged Warblers establish their nesting grounds in the northeastern United States and parts of Canada. They favor early successional habitats, including shrubby areas, regenerating forests, and recently burned areas.

Immerse yourself in the sweet and high-pitched song of the Golden-winged Warbler, a delightful melody that resonates through the woodlands. Their songs are a true reflection of their refined nature and add a touch of elegance to the surrounding environment.

Nests of the Golden-winged Warbler are skillfully crafted in low shrubs or small trees, often hidden within dense vegetation. They are made from grass, plant fibers, and bark, forming a neat and compact cup-shaped structure. The female Golden-winged Warbler lays a clutch of 4-5 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-14 days.

Fun Fact: Golden-winged Warblers are known for their interesting breeding behavior known as “alloparental care.” Males and females sometimes join forces to raise the offspring of other Golden-winged Warbler pairs, assisting in feeding and protecting the young, even if they are not their biological offspring.

23. Cerulean Warbler

Embrace the enchanting presence of the Cerulean Warbler, a migratory songbird that graces Vermont during the breeding season. Marvel at their exquisite beauty and cherish the opportunity to witness their ethereal presence in the state’s woodlands.

Cerulean Warblers exhibit a captivating appearance, with sky-blue upperparts and a contrasting white underbelly. Males possess a bold black necklace on their throat and a distinct cerulean-blue color that defines their plumage. Females are slightly duller in color but still showcase the characteristic blue tones.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga cerulea
  • Length: 4.3-4.7 inches (11-12 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (8-12 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.3 inches (19-21 cm)

During the breeding season, Cerulean Warblers establish their nesting grounds in the eastern United States and parts of Canada. They favor mature deciduous forests with a dense canopy and an abundance of insects.

Immerse yourself in the soft and high-pitched song of the Cerulean Warbler, a delicate and soothing melody that floats through the treetops. Their songs evoke a sense of serenity and add a touch of tranquility to the surrounding woodlands.

Nests of the Cerulean Warbler are skillfully constructed high up in mature trees, often hidden amidst dense foliage. They are made from grass, plant fibers, and bark, forming a delicate cup-shaped structure. The female Cerulean Warbler lays a clutch of 3-5 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-14 days.

Fun Fact: Cerulean Warblers are known for their unique foraging behavior, as they often hang upside-down from branches to search for insects in the underside of leaves. This acrobatic feeding technique sets them apart from other warbler species and adds a touch of charm to their woodland presence.

24. Tennessee Warbler

Celebrate the presence of the Tennessee Warbler, a migratory songbird that graces Vermont during its journey of migration. Marvel at its subtle beauty and cherish the moments when this fleeting visitor makes its appearance in the state.

Tennessee Warblers showcase a delicate and understated appearance, with olive-green upperparts and a pale yellow underbelly. They possess a faint gray cap on their head, which adds a touch of elegance to their overall plumage.

  • Scientific Name: Leiothlypis peregrina
  • Length: 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (8-12 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.3 inches (19-21 cm)

During migration, Tennessee Warblers pass through Vermont as they travel from their breeding grounds in Canada to their wintering grounds in Central and South America. They favor various habitats, including forests, woodlands, and shrubby areas.

Immerse yourself in the gentle and buzzing song of the Tennessee Warbler, a soft melody that accompanies its journey through the trees. Their songs reflect the transience of their visit and create a sense of connection with the natural world.

Nests of the Tennessee Warbler are skillfully constructed in trees or shrubs, often hidden within dense vegetation. They are made from grass, plant fibers, and bark, forming a compact cup-shaped structure. The female Tennessee Warbler lays a clutch of 4-6 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 11-13 days.

Fun Fact: Tennessee Warblers are known for their strong migratory instincts and ability to cover vast distances. These small songbirds can travel thousands of miles each year, making their journey from breeding grounds to wintering grounds and back, showcasing the remarkable endurance of migratory species.

25. Bay-breasted Warbler

Embrace the fleeting presence of the Bay-breasted Warbler, a migratory songbird that graces Vermont during its journey of migration. Marvel at its striking appearance and cherish the moments when this rare visitor blesses the state with its presence.

Bay-breasted Warblers exhibit a stunning combination of rose-colored upperparts and a pale yellow underbelly. Males possess a distinct chestnut crown, which adds a touch of elegance to their overall plumage. Females are slightly duller in color but still showcase the characteristic pink tones.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga castanea
  • Length: 4.7-5.1 inches (12-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (8-12 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.3 inches (19-21 cm)

During migration, Bay-breasted Warblers pass through Vermont as they travel from their breeding grounds in Canada to their wintering grounds in Central and South America. They favor various habitats, including forests, woodlands, and shrubby areas.

Immerse yourself in the soft and high-pitched song of the Bay-breasted Warbler, a delicate melody that resonates through the trees. Their songs evoke a sense of tranquility and create a connection with the beauty of the natural world.

Nests of the Bay-breasted Warbler are skillfully constructed in trees or shrubs, often hidden within dense foliage. They are made from grass, plant fibers, and bark, forming a compact cup-shaped structure. The female Bay-breasted Warbler lays a clutch of 4-5 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-13 days.

Fun Fact: Despite their striking appearance, Bay-breasted Warblers can be quite elusive and difficult to spot. Their preference for high-canopy habitats and their tendency to forage actively among the foliage make them a challenge to observe, adding a sense of excitement and intrigue to their presence.

26. Blackburnian Warbler

Celebrate the presence of the Blackburnian Warbler, a migratory songbird that graces Vermont during its journey of migration. Marvel at its vibrant colors and cherish the moments when this dazzling visitor brightens the state’s woodlands.

Blackburnian Warblers showcase a breathtaking appearance, with fiery orange throat and upper breast, contrasted by black and white plumage on the rest of their body. Males possess a striking black face mask that highlights their intense colors. Females are slightly duller in color but still exhibit the characteristic fiery tones.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga fusca
  • Length: 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (8-12 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.3 inches (19-21 cm)

During migration, Blackburnian Warblers pass through Vermont as they travel from their breeding grounds in Canada to their wintering grounds in Central and South America. They favor various habitats, including coniferous forests and mixed woodlands.

Immerse yourself in the high-pitched and sweet song of the Blackburnian Warbler, a melodious tune that carries through the treetops. Their songs reflect their vibrant nature and add a touch of energy to the surrounding woodlands.

Nests of the Blackburnian Warbler are skillfully constructed high up in coniferous trees, often hidden amidst dense foliage. They are made from twigs, plant fibers, and bark, forming a delicate and compact cup-shaped structure. The female Blackburnian Warbler lays a clutch of 3-5 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-13 days.

Fun Fact: The Blackburnian Warbler is named after Anna Blackburne, an 18th-century English botanist who contributed significantly to the field of botany and the study of natural history. The striking colors of this warbler species serve as a fitting tribute to her legacy.

27. Chestnut-sided Warbler

Celebrate the presence of the Chestnut-sided Warbler, a migratory songbird that graces Vermont during its journey of migration. Marvel at its distinctive appearance and cherish the moments when this delightful visitor adds a touch of charm to the state’s woodlands.

Chestnut-sided Warblers exhibit a striking combination of yellow underparts and grayish-green upperparts. Males possess bold chestnut-colored patches on their sides, which give them their unique name. Females are slightly duller in color but still showcase the characteristic yellow tones.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga pensylvanica
  • Length: 4.3-5.1 inches (11-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (8-12 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.3 inches (19-21 cm)

During migration, Chestnut-sided Warblers pass through Vermont as they travel from their breeding grounds in Canada to their wintering grounds in Central and South America. They favor various habitats, including forests, woodlands, and shrubby areas.

Immerse yourself in the sweet and buzzy song of the Chestnut-sided Warbler, a delightful melody that resonates through the trees. Their songs reflect their lively nature and add a touch of cheer to the surrounding woodlands.

Nests of the Chestnut-sided Warbler are skillfully constructed in low shrubs or small trees, often hidden within dense vegetation. They are made from grass, plant fibers, and bark, forming a neat and compact cup-shaped structure. The female Chestnut-sided Warbler lays a clutch of 3-5 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-13 days.

Fun Fact: Chestnut-sided Warblers are known for their unique foraging behavior, as they actively glean insects from foliage and tree trunks. They often hang upside-down while foraging, displaying their agility and adaptability in their search for food.

28. Palm Warbler

Celebrate the presence of the Palm Warbler, a migratory songbird that graces Vermont during its journey of migration. Marvel at its subtle beauty and cherish the moments when this lively visitor adds a touch of liveliness to the state’s woodlands.

Palm Warblers exhibit a charming appearance, with olive-brown upperparts and a pale yellow underbelly. They possess a distinct rusty cap on their head, which adds a touch of color to their overall plumage.

  • Scientific Name: Setophaga palmarum
  • Length: 4.7-5.1 inches (12-13 cm)
  • Weight: 0.3-0.4 ounces (8-12 g)
  • Wingspan: 7.5-8.3 inches (19-21 cm)

During migration, Palm Warblers pass through Vermont as they travel from their breeding grounds in Canada to their wintering grounds in the southeastern United States and the Caribbean. They favor various habitats, including open woodlands, shrubby areas, and grassy fields.

Immerse yourself in the high-pitched and trilling song of the Palm Warbler, a lively tune that resonates through the woodlands. Their songs reflect their energetic nature and add a touch of liveliness to the surrounding environment.

Nests of the Palm Warbler are skillfully constructed on the ground, often hidden within vegetation or in shallow depressions. They are made from grass, plant fibers, and moss, forming a compact and well-concealed cup-shaped structure. The female Palm Warbler lays a clutch of 4-5 eggs, which hatch after an incubation period of approximately 12-14 days.

Fun Fact: Palm Warblers are known for their distinctive tail-wagging behavior. They frequently pump their tails up and down while foraging on the ground, displaying this unique behavior that sets them apart from other warbler species.

Warbler Song Guide: Discovering the Melodies of Warblers

When it comes to warblers, their songs can often precede their sight, making it essential to familiarize yourself with their distinct tunes for easier identification. Fortunately, some warblers have more recognizable songs than others.

Warbler songs can be described as buzzy, clear, or trilling, with variations in pitch and multiple melodic elements. The buzzing notes resemble the sound of insects, clear notes resemble whistles, and trills are rapid and blend together.

In this comprehensive guide, you can listen to the songs of various warblers. Additionally, you can explore a dedicated resource featuring 13 easily recognizable warbler songs to aid your identification efforts.

Warblers with Buzzy Songs:

– The Black-throated Blue Warbler’s song rises and carries a buzzy quality.
– Prairie Warblers also possess buzzy songs that rise in pitch.
– Black-throated Green Warblers’ songs have buzzy elements with intermittent clear notes.
– Blackpoll Warblers produce clear and steady songs that mimic insect buzz.
– Prairie Warblers’ songs are buzzy and exhibit a rising pitch.
– Palm Warblers’ songs have a distinctive buzzy quality.

Warblers with Songs Featuring Clear Notes:

– The Common Yellowthroat sings a series of rising and falling notes, repeated in sequence.
– Ovenbirds produce a melodious pattern of rising and falling notes.
– Hooded Warblers have songs characterized by clear notes.
– Chestnut-sided Warblers sing a series of clear falling notes that accelerate towards the end.
– Yellow-rumped Warblers create a sequence of clear notes that gradually fade out.
– Yellow Warblers’ songs accelerate in tempo.
– Northern Parulas’ songs feature a rising trill that concludes with a distinctive note.
– Wilson’s Warblers’ songs consist of clear falling notes that progressively speed up.

Understanding the Frequency of Warbler Sightings in Vermont during Summer and Winter

Checklists provide valuable insights into the common warbler sightings within a particular state. By analyzing data from eBird, the following percentages represent the most frequently recorded warblers in Vermont during summer:

  • Common Yellowthroat: 37.3%
    Ovenbird: 30.9%
  • Yellow Warbler: 24.8%
  • Chestnut-sided Warbler: 22.1%
  • American Redstart: 20.4%
  • Yellow-rumped Warbler: 17.5%
  • Black-and-white Warbler: 14.8%
  • Black-throated Green Warbler: 14.2%
  • Black-throated Blue Warbler: 11.9%
  • Blackburnian Warbler: 9.1%
  • Pine Warbler: 7.0%
  • Northern Parula: 6.7%
  • Magnolia Warbler: 6.2%
  • Nashville Warbler: 5.0%
  • Northern Waterthrush: 4.5%
  • Blackpoll Warbler: 3.0%
  • Canada Warbler: 2.6%
  • Mourning Warbler: 1.9%
  • Louisiana Waterthrush: 1.7%
  • Tennessee Warbler: 1.6%
  • Palm Warbler: 1.3%
  • Blue-winged Warbler: 1.2%
  • Golden-winged Warbler: 0.7%
  • Bay-breasted Warbler: 0.7%
  • Wilson’s Warbler: 0.5%
  • Cerulean Warbler: 0.3%
  • Orange-crowned Warbler: <0.1%

During winter, the following warblers were recorded in Vermont:

  • Yellow-rumped Warbler: 0.2%
  • Pine Warbler: <0.1%
  • Common Yellowthroat: <0.1%
  • Northern Parula: <0.1%
  • Palm Warbler: <0.1%
  • Yellow Warbler: <0.1%
  • Orange-crowned Warbler: <0.1%
  • Black-throated Green Warbler: <0.1%
  • Tennessee Warbler: <0.1%
  • Ovenbird: <0.1%
  • Black-throated Blue Warbler: <0.1%
  • Nashville Warbler: <0.1%

Attracting Warblers to Your Backyard

While warblers may not frequent backyard feeders as often as other songbirds, there are ways to invite these melodious creatures to your yard:

1. Provide trees if your yard has sufficient space.
2. Maintain brush piles and embrace some natural untidiness to create habitats for insects, which warblers feed on.
3. Avoid using pesticides or herbicides to ensure an abundance of insects without compromising bird health.
4. Install a clean water source for birds to drink and bathe.
5. Offer mealworms, preferably live ones, or dried alternatives.
6. Set up bird feeders with sunflower seeds, peanut hearts, and suet.

By implementing these measures, you can increase the likelihood of warblers gracing your backyard with their enchanting presence.

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